FISH MARKET

Design: 2013 - 2015
Completed: July 2017
Program: 350 m2 indoor market and restaurant
Client: Indre Oslofjord Fiskerlag
Location: Rådhusbrygge, Oslo, Norway

CONNECTING CITY AND SEA

FISH MARKET
CONNECTING CITY AND SEA

Design: 2013 - 2015
Completed: July 2017
Program: 350 m2 indoor market and restaurant
Client: Indre Oslofjord Fiskerlag
Location: Rådhusbrygge, Oslo, Norway
Photo: Finn Ståle Felberg

Located in the harbor of Oslo, the new fish market strengthens the fjord city identity; an open structure, connecting the city and the sea. The fish market, with its openness, placement and program, contributes to a varied urban life along the seaside – rooted in maritime activity.

Aerial view diagram

Oslo fish market emerges as a simple, quiet and minimalistic structure between the City Hall, Akershus Fortress, the busy Aker Brygge area and the fjord. The building is a one-story pavilion with glass facades opening in all directions, and where fresh fish and sea-food changes hands, all under a beautiful coffered concrete ceiling - cast in situ. The roof cantilevers and creates a covered area along the façade. During summer season, the glass panels can open, and wipe out the distinction between in- and outside, making the market a seamless continuation of the urban floor. 

The glass panels can open up, and minimize distinction between in- and outside. Photo: Finn Ståle Felberg
Main idea diagram; a built connection between city and sea.
Main principle diagram; an open, flexible structure that opens up in all four direction.
Interior view. The kitchen is open, and exposes the process of preparation to the visitors. Photo: Finn Ståle Felberg
The fish market is a sober, silent and honest structure, in-between downtown prominent buildings, such as the town hall. Photo: Finn Ståle Felberg
The pavilion is located at the border of the Rådhusplassen square, and creates a built connection between the public space and the harbor, where local fishermen anchor up to sell their fresh fish and sea food.
Model - the roof is the building's fifth, and most prominent facade. When the glass facades are open, the building appears as a covered, seamless continuation of the urban floor.
Photo: Finn Ståle Felberg